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40k Terrain: Still working on obstacles and barricades

IMG 2204 300x225 40k Terrain: Still working on obstacles and barricadesContinued working this weekend on obstacles and barricades my Cities of Death game board. I’ve got several items reading for rock, grit, and sand now. This includes five of six barricades. These have the foam rocks and other debris mounted that I made last week, along with broken sprue bits added. I also experimented with making tank traps – Dragon’s Teeth style which are made of concrete and also those made of welded together iron girders. These turned out looking very nice. I made three ruins piles, as well. I’m still working on designing mine fields. I’ll finish these up through the week, and make sure to get some video as I go. By the weekend, I hope to be ready to paint this set of 40k scenery.

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I’ve also been doing some research on what ruined cities look like. I think that destruction on the order of what we expect for 40k Terrain means we need to look at the destruction wrecked during the aerial bombardment campaigns of WWII. There are several great images on the web, and here are a few general observations.

  • The damage is nearly random. It’s nearly because it was only done where planes dropped bombs, and there were structures that the bombers attempted to avoid (like Cathedrals). Yet, where the destruction was intended, its pseudo random, with damage kind of clustering as it drifts through the city. The result is interesting. There are relatively undamaged buildings in the midst of utter destruction; conversely, there will be clusters of buildings nearly intact – possibly completely undamaged – next to buildings that were utterly destroyed.
  • Often, destroyed buildings were utterly wrecked. They were reduced to dust and gravel – literally. This created mounds of debris. Intermixed with pulverized stone and brick are planks and various living effects of the previous occupants. And LOTS of paper.

  • Trees survived. It’s hard to kill a tree, and you see outlines of streets from trees that still have their leaves even though the street itself is completely covered in rubble.
  • The scale of the buildings, relative to people, is HUGE. We always need to keep playability in mind, but I think it’s a good idea to think gigantic when planning your ruins.
  • There are flashes of color mixed in with the drab light grey and tan of the rubble. Brick walls, painted plaster, whatever.

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I think I might do a little essay for the Cities of Death section of the web site on bomb damage. That aside, I have  plenty to think about as I design the next step of my Cities of Death game board. After I get these starting Warhammer terrain pieces done, I’m going to make a basic game board. Just the typical concrete base we all see everywhere. After that, though, we’re going to get creative. I just hope my modeling skills are up to my imagination!

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Monday, January 31st, 2011 at 8:35 am • 40k scenery, 40k terrain, cities of death, warhammer sceneryRSS 2.0 feed • leave a response or trackback

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